Though we often think of displaying collectibles in the living spaces of our homes, we don't always think of them for the bedroom. But collections that are personal and meaningful are at home in this private space, too. An assortment of blue-and-white plates or framed vintage hankies can become a pretty array above a headboard. By mounting shelves, cubbyholes, or shadowboxes to the wall, you can show off any three-dimensional objects, from teacups to retro clocks to rare books.

Out of every space in a home, your bedroom is without a doubt the most personal. Even though it's an area many of your guests may never actually see, it still deserves a great deal of attention. It's where you recharge, reflect on the day, and even spend time reading a book, so it only makes sense for it to feature the right color palette and furnishings. And let’s not forget that it also has to showcase your design style accurately and complement the overall aesthetic that’s reflected in other areas of your home.
Furnishing your teenage bedroom is a must but when it comes to furniture, you don't have to spend a lot to get a lot. I've found that vintage furniture is often better quality than new and can be found for super-cheap at estate sales and flea markets. If you have minimal DIY skills, with a little paint, almost any old piece of furniture can be made into something new. If you prefer new, there are great places to find affordable furniture for teenage bedrooms.

How to figure out this number: It should be enough pillows so that your bed looks sumptuous and inviting when properly made, yet not so many that getting in bed requires 10 minutes of excavating. The sweet spot is usually between two to six, depending on the size of your bed. The bedroom of this Connecticut country home makes a solid argument for four being the perfect number!

Instead of sticking with plain white walls, considering another neutral that adds a subtle yet bold twist. "Responding to an unusual Y-shaped floor plan required a strategy to pull light from all directions to create a range of shifting light experiences: Moody and subtle to the south; bright and open to the east," explain the designers behind Arent & Pyke. For a moodier bedroom that isn't full-on dark, try a steel blue gray like this one. And then lighten things up with colorful linens and keep things streamlined with bright a white ceiling and modern bedside sconce.
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